“Is an MBA ‘value added’? Ask the grads” — Publishing Trends

Here’s an article that I found helpful on Publishing Trends.

I am now at a time in my life where I’m trying to figure out which way to go. Should I drop everything and run off to grad school to get a master’s degree? I really want one. Or should I stay at my job and continue to work to strengthen my skills and broaden my knowledge of the publishing industry?

It’s hard to study and work at the same time, especially when all the great classes are usually during my work hours (I find that very annoying). But this gave me a bit of clarity. Really, at this time it doesn’t make sense to quit my job to enroll full-time. As stated in the article, I might be unable to get a job when I’m done, which is something I’ve observed amongst my friends and acquaintances.

“An MBA helps open doors up, and is often preferred, but it’s not an automatic ‘in’ anymore,” said Steven Sandonato, vice president for strategy and business development at Time Home Entertainment Inc.

From the article I’ve garnered that I need to question my “motivation” for going back to school. According to those interviewed, if it’s simply to receive a higher salary, then it’s pointless; but if it’s to gain a better understanding of certain aspects of the industry, or to totally change my career path, then sure, it’s a good idea.

“Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” by J.K. Rowling

For some reason, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets has never left an impression on me even when I was a young fan. Back then, I read it just so I could move on to the next book in the series. It was simply a passing note for me, an installment that needed to be read so I could understand what comes next.

Available on Amazon and at your local bookstore.

Now a few years older, I’ve read it again and still it didn’t give me a POW! like the first book. However, instead of simply bypassing it, I am able to see the little breadcrumbs that Rowling drops to alert the reader of what’s to come.

This is one of the reasons why I love the Harry Potter series. All the books relate and everything ties into each other. We see Voldemort’s first horcrux Tom Riddle’s diary – and by the end of the series, we understand that he murdered Moaning Myrtle (though she wasn’t moaning back then, bawling maybe) to create it. We also learn that a piece of Voldemort lives inside Harry Potter (an eighth* horcrux, which explains Harry’s partial resemblance to Riddle and his having powers similar to Voldemort: parseltongue). I don’t think this is mentioned again until the final book when that part of Harry is removed.

The important lesson in this installment is that it’s our choices that make us who we are, as Dumbledore advised Harry. This is the same as the lesson taught to Richard by Zeddicus Zul Zorander in The Wizard’s First Rule (a book I began but am unable to finish due to its circuitous nature and annoyingly love-struck characters). Dumbledore shares this lesson with Harry since Harry doubts his placement in Gryffindor; however, Dumbledore states that because Harry asked not to be placed in Slytherin, he made a choice that reflects his character and sets him apart from Voldemort. He exercised his freewill.

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