Bookshelf Tour, Pt. 18 | Middle Grade (continues)

Okay, so today we’ll tour a row that has nothing but middle grade books on it. It has some of my favorite series as well, majority Rick Riordan — which I can’t help because I really enjoy the Percy Jackson series. It even held up well on my recent reread of it.

I didn’t read the Percy Jackson books until a couple years after they were published. People kept comparing them to the Harry Potter books, which made me think they were like them and I wasn’t feeling that. When I finally gave them a try, I was a little annoyed at myself for waiting so long to read such an entertaining story.

The books are light, fast reads that are like a crazy rollercoaster ride from beginning to end. And I just love that it’s based on Greek and Roman mythology. That made me like the stories even more and made me do my own research on such mythologies, mostly because certain things I thought Riordan made up I later learned were from the myths (like the Clazmonian Sow).

But anyway, we aren’t here to review Rick Riordan’s books, we’re here to tour my bookshelves. Here’s a look at the bookcase we’re on:

And now, we’re on the second row of the second shelf from the bottom — where the middle grade books begin.

Continue reading “Bookshelf Tour, Pt. 18 | Middle Grade (continues)”

Weekend Reads #107: Anger

You ever feel so angry and frustrated that it’s as if the emotions are choking you? That’s how I feel. Angry, frustrated, exhausted, and powerless.

Since the beginning of this year, I’ve tried to stay on top of news and politics, but the more updates I consume, the more angry and frustrated I get. I mean… yo! Jacob Blake was shot 7 TIMES!! in his back. By the police. In front of his kids! While walking toward his SUV after trying to break up a fight. What??!!

And a White kid was going around the same area (Kenosha, Wis.) toting a big-ass gun and shooting protesters; he was able to walk by the police with his gun and go home WITHOUT getting shot by the police… or stopped by them. Apparently, he got a bottle of water from them.

This is fucking crazy world. A crazy country.

I won’t even mention what’s going on in politics regarding the antics and some of the shit said at the RNC. I just…

UGH!!!

“Ocean Meets Sky” by the Fan Brothers (illus.) — Terry & Eric Fan

I had no idea what this story was about before reading it. I bought it solely because of the cover, which is amazing. I love the illustrations.

Genre:

Fantasy

Series:

n/a

Pubbed:

2018

Goodreads summary:

Finn lives by the sea and the sea lives by him. Every time he looks out his window it’s a constant reminder of the stories his grandfather told him about the place where the ocean meets the sky. Where whales and jellyfish soar and birds and castles float.

Continue reading ““Ocean Meets Sky” by the Fan Brothers (illus.) — Terry & Eric Fan”

“Rocket Says Look Up!” by Nathan Bryon, illus. by Dapo Adeola

I bought this shortly after doing my post on picture books by Black authors. Actually, I bought a couple books after that post — I couldn’t help it. But I’m glad I got this one. It was a good read.

Genre:

Children’s Contemporary

Series:

n/a

Pubbed:

2019

Goodreads summary:

Meet Rocket — a plucky aspiring astronaut intent on getting her community to LOOK UP! from what they’re doing and reach for the stars in this auspicious debut picture book.

A comet will be visible tonight, and Rocket wants everyone to see it with her — even her big brother, Jamal, whose attention is usually trained on his phone or video games. Rocket’s enthusiasm brings neighbors and family together to witness a once-in-a-lifetime sighting. Perfect for fans of Ada Twist, Scientist and young science lovers excited about the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, Look Up! will inspire readers of all ages to dream big as it models Rocket’s passion for science and infectious curiosity. (Goodreads)

Continue reading ““Rocket Says Look Up!” by Nathan Bryon, illus. by Dapo Adeola”

“Julia’s House Moves On” by Ben Hatke (illus.)

I’ve been curious about Ben Hatke’s work for some time now and have wanted to read his Nobody Likes a Goblin, but I keep forgetting to get myself a copy. So, when I saw the cover of Julia’s House Moves On on NetGalley, I jumped at the chance to read it and was glad that I was granted access to it. So shout out to the publisher — First Second. (Thanks!)

(So yea, I got an ARC from the publisher, but my review below is my honest opinion of the book.)

Genre:

Children’s Fantasy

Series:

n/a (but there’s a book before this one with the same protagonist called Julia’s House for Lost Creatures)

Continue reading ““Julia’s House Moves On” by Ben Hatke (illus.)”

“Shaman’s Crossing” by Robin Hobb

I really enjoyed reading this book, and I consider it a favorite. Emily at Embuhleeliest, my buddy-reader in all things Hobb, and I completed the Realm of the Elderlings books last year and really wrapped it up by reading a novella and a short story set in its world earlier this year. We then took a break before jumping into Hobb’s Soldier Son trilogy, which is fantasy but set in a different world than the Elderlings books and which begins with this novel — Shaman’s Crossing.

I had such a good time reading this novel with Emily that I slowly fell into a little reading and blogging slump. It took a while to move on from this story, especially since the books I picked up after it were lackluster. I also had a hard time drumming up energy to create new posts for my blog because I was procrastinating on reviewing this. I needed to get out my thoughts on it, but there were so many that I didn’t know where to start.

Genre:

Fantasy

Series:

Soldier Son trilogy, book 1

Pubbed:

2005

Quick summary:

Like the Farseer trilogy, Shaman’s Crossing begins with the protagonist, Nevare, as a young boy learning about his station and duty in life and the world beyond his father’s lands. Through him, we learn that he lives in a very patriarchal society that is also very religious. Sons are treasured, of course, and the religion dictates that the first son becomes his father’s heir while the second son serves as a soldier; the third son should be a priest, the fourth son an artist, and the fifth son a scholar. Nevare is the second son and strongly believes his destiny is to become a soldier, like his father.

Continue reading ““Shaman’s Crossing” by Robin Hobb”

Bookshelf Tour, Pt. 17 | Middle Grade (begins)

It’s time to tour the middle grade books!! 🤣😆🤣

This is my favorite shelf after the adult fantasy bookshelf and the comic book ones. I don’t read a lot of middle-grade fantasy these days, but I’m trying to get back to doing so. Back in college, the majority of books I read for fun were middle-grade fantasy. They were a nice break from the heavy reading and analysis I had to do for classes. They were light reads that were fun and quick to get through.

These days, I’m so focused on the many adult fantasy books on my TBR that I’ve neglected the middle grade ones. But not anymore! In September, I’ll start making more effort to read at least one each month.

So let’s take a look at the bookcase we’re currently touring:

Okay, so I’m getting a little ahead of myself because I forgot that the first row of this shelf has some overflow from the classics shelf, so you’ll see some of those books mixed in with the middle grade ones. Here, let’s take a look.

Continue reading “Bookshelf Tour, Pt. 17 | Middle Grade (begins)”

Bookshelf Tour, Pt. 16 | Classics (continues)

The classics. We don’t often get along. Most times, I avoid them thinking they are too hard to read or too boring, but they sometimes surprise me. Since starting this blog, I’ve realized that it’s best that I’m not forced to read the classics. I just about hated all the ones I was forced to read for classes, but when I picked up some on my own, I ended up liking them (The Great Gatsby) or was at least patient with them (She).

I owned more classics than I currently have on my shelves, but I donated a bunch to my library the last time I weeded my shelves. There were some I knew I’d never read (like a huge book of Edgar Allan Poe’s work I had. It was too big and intimidating. I’ll get access to his work some other way) and others I didn’t want to keep (again — She by H. Rider Haggard, which was racist, xenophobic, sexist, and every other negative thing but written quite well and was interesting in some parts).

I would like to read more classics — I even joined the Classics Club Reading Challenge to do so — but I read books based on my mood, and I never gravitate toward the classics. I keep telling myself that I’ll try harder, and I have, but it’s mostly to pick up small, quick reads, lol. But I’m optimistic that I’ll work through more of them eventually.

Anyway, we’re touring my second bookcase:

And we’re on the classics shelf — the shelf all the way at the bottom. We’re on the second row:

Continue reading “Bookshelf Tour, Pt. 16 | Classics (continues)”

“Drowned Country” by Emily Tesh

Here’s to show how very trivial it is for me to rate things. I enjoyed Drowned Country much more than I did Silver in the Wood, but I gave Silver in the Wood a half star higher rating than Drowned Country. Why? Because Drowned Country felt like a 3 star and Silver in the Wood felt like a 3.5 star…? Basically, not much reason at all. Anyway…

Genre:

Fantasy

Series:

Greenhollow, book 2

Pub:

August 18, 2020

Goodreads summary:

Drowned Country is the the stunning sequel to Silver in the Wood, Emily Tesh’s lush, folkloric debut. This second volume of the Greenhollow duology once again invites readers to lose themselves in the story of Henry and Tobias, and the magic of a myth they’ve always known.

Continue reading ““Drowned Country” by Emily Tesh”