Top 5 Tuesday #72: Weddings & Births

Top 5 Tuesday is a weekly meme created by Shanah, the Bionic Book Worm, and now hosted by Meeghan at Meeghan Reads.

So my intention with this post was to play catch up and make it a list of 10 things, but it turns out that I haven’t read many things that include the topics below — or my memory isn’t serving me well at the moment — so to come up with a list of 5, I’ve combined the selections for last week and this week’s topics into one list.

This week’s and last week’s topic combo:

Top 5 books about weddings & births


The Duke & I by Julia Quinn

Of course a Bridgerton book would contain a wedding. The Duke & I is the first in this Regency romance series about the extensive Bridgerton family whose matriarch seeks to secure happy, love-filled marriages for her children. I enjoyed the first book as much as I did its TV show adaptation on Netflix. As for the second book, The Viscount Who Loved Me, I enjoyed the TV show more than I did the book.

The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold

This, too, is the first in a series. The Curse of Chalion is a fantasy novel about a war veteran returning home in search of peace and comfort but gets swept up in political intrigues when he’s appointed secretary to a princess. There is a wedding in this novel that seems as much a love match as in the Bridgerton book despite being driven by political need to avoid an impending battle that may rip the kingdom apart and to hopefully break a powerful, long-standing curse.

Witches Abroad by Terry Pratchett

Umm… This one is a bit iffy. A wedding is mentioned, but I can’t recall if it happened. And, being that this book is about the Lancre witches — Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, and Magrat Garlick — and their goal is to stop a girl from marrying a prince, I’m pretty sure the wedding didn’t happen, because things these women collectively (or singularly — if it’s Granny Weatherwax or Nanny Ogg) don’t want to happen ever does. Witches Abroad is from Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series, a collection of fantasy books set on a flat world that rests atop four large elephants that stand upon the shell of an enormous turtle floating through space.

Bingo Love by Tee Franklin, illus. by Jenn St-Onge

Bingo Love is a contemporary comic book about a woman who’s reunited with the woman she loved in her teen years after several years have passed. There is a minor character in the story who goes into labor following a short argument. The story focuses on the love between the women but on familial relationships as well.

Fool’s Assassin by Robin Hobb

Fool’s Assassin is the first novel in the Fitz and the Fool trilogy, the last bunch of books in the Realm of the Elderlings fantasy series (for now — I fervently hope). One of the protagonists is born in this book, and her birth is quite interesting. And… that’s all I can say without spoiling things.


And that’s it for books I can think of that have weddings or births in them. I’m sure I’ve read more, but I couldn’t think of them.

3 thoughts on “Top 5 Tuesday #72: Weddings & Births

  1. Hahaha, snap on The Duke and I!! And there IS a wedding in Witches Abroad!! It’s the story that Pratchett pokes a lot of fun at fairytales in (particularly Cinderella, from memory). Granny, Nanny and Magrat try to stop a wedding, and then they just stop the person behind the wedding. It’s been a while but I think there’s a wedding in the end anyway?! Regardless, great list this week 💕

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    1. Oh great! I was wondering if I got Witches Abroad a bit wrong there. I love that it pokes at Cinderella fairytale. One of the many reasons why it’s my favorite Discworld book so far.

      Liked by 1 person

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