Comics Roundup #34: Tea Dragon Society, Monstress, & the Fullmetal Alchemist

And I’m back with another set of mini reviews. I might consider making this a thing.

This set contains two graphic novels, a comic book, and one manga, and all are great. I consider them all favorites and look forward to continuing with the stories.

The two graphic novels center on two of my favorite things: tea and dragons. The comic book is the third volume in one of my favorite series, and the manga is a collection of volumes of one of my favorite stories. Reading these were a treat and hopefully I’ll convince you all to try them too.


The Tea Dragon Society and The Tea Dragon Festival by Katie O’Neill (illus.)

Genre:

MG Fantasy

Series:

Tea Dragon, book 1
Tea Dragon, book 2

Pubbed:

October 2017
September 2019

Quick summary:

The Tea Dragon Society introduces us to Greta, a young blacksmith apprentice, who finds a lost a tea dragon while at the market and returns it to its owner, a kind teashop owner named Hesekiel. Greta befriends Hesekiel and his partner Erik and learns from them the dying art of caring for tea dragons, small, gentle creatures that grow tea leaves from their horns. While visiting them, Greta runs into Minette, a shy, young girl who lives at the teashop who Greta hopes to befriend. It’s a sweet story about the beginning of a friendship. (Goodreads)

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Comics Roundup #33: “Moonshot”

I totally bought this comic book for the cover. I learned about it from a review on Rich in Color back in 2016. The cover immediately sold me on the book, but the review intrigued me when I learned that it features stories by indigenous storytellers across North America.

It is an anthology, so some stories appealed to me while others didn’t; however, I appreciate that this anthology presents stories about indigenous people by indigenous creators and that I got to learn a bit about their cultures from the stories. Some background is given either about the creator or the story at the beginning of each story, which I greatly appreciated because we sometimes learn what inspired the story or where it originated from and why. So in addition to reading this comic book to be entertained, I learned something new as well.


Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection, Vol. 1 ed. By Hope Nicholson

Genre:

Fantasy; Sci-fi; Horror

Series:

Moonshot, volume 1

Pubbed:

2015

Goodreads summary:

Produced by AH Comics Inc. and edited by Hope Nicholson, Moonshot brings together dozens of creators from across North America to contribute comic book stories showcasing the rich heritage and identity of indigenous storytelling.

From traditional stories to exciting new visions of the future, this collection presents some of the finest comic book and graphic novel work in North America. The traditional stories presented in the book are with the permission from the elders in their respective communities, making this a truly genuine, never-before-seen publication. Moonshot is an incredible collection that is sure to amaze, intrigue and entertain! (Goodreads)

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Comics Roundup #32: “Moon Girl & Devil Dinosaur” and “Moonstruck, Vol. 1”

Aww man. Comics Roundup #32 features two comics that were disappointments for me. I really thought I would love them both, but they left me feeling bored. The upside, though, is that I really love the art and characters in one of them, which made me enjoy it a little.

I read both of these for the NEWTs Magical Readathon.


Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur, Vol. 1: BFF by Brandon Montclare & Amy Reeder, illus. by Natacha Bustos with colors by Tamra Bonvillain

Genre:

YA sci-fi

Series:

Marvel-verse
Moon Girl & Devil Dinosaur, volume 1

Pubbed:

November 2015

Quick summary:

This is the first volume of a comic book based in the Marvel universe. It’s about Lunella Lafayette, a preteen genius who’s bored at school because she’s preoccupied with worrying about her latent inhuman gene. She befriends a dinosaur who was sent through time to protect an orb that Lunella calls an Omni-Wave Projector from prehistoric savages. The two get up to crazy shenanigans to get and protect the orb all while wreaking havoc on the city in their attempts to do so. (Goodreads)

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Comics Roundup #31: “The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil”

This is one of many books I added to my TBR during my booktube craze. Back then, I’d get excited about whatever book was mentioned by a booktuber, buy it, and promptly throw it on my bookshelf to forget about it. That’s what happened to this one until I finally decided to read it for the NEWTs Magical Readathon.


The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil by Stephen Collins (illus.)

Genre:

Fantasy

Series:

n/a

Pubbed:

June 2013

Goodreads summary:

On the island of Here, livin’s easy. Conduct is orderly. Lawns are neat. Citizens are clean shaven — and Dave is the most fastidious of them all. Dave is bald, but for a single hair. He loves drawing, his desk job, and the Bangles. But on one fateful day, his life is upended… by an unstoppable (yet pretty impressive) beard.

An off-beat fable worthy of Roald Dahl and Tim Burton, Stephen Collins’ The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil is a darkly funny meditation on life, death, and what it means to be different — and a timeless ode to the art of beard maintenance. (Goodreads)

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Comics Roundup #30: “Through the Woods”

So, I finally read Through the Woods. This was a long time coming. There was a lot of buzz around it when it was published in 2014. My interest perked, I placed it on my TBR back then and bought it in the following year intending to “read it soon.” It languished on my bookshelf since then until April this year, when I read it for the O.W.L. Magical Readathon.

Before that readathon, other bloggers who’ve read and loved the book have always encouraged me to give it a go, but I would always place it on my TBR and neglect to read it. Now I did, and I agree: It’s pretty good.


Through the Woods by Emily Carroll (illus.)

Genre:

YA Horror

Series:

n/a

Pubbed:

July 2014

Quick summary:

Through the Woods is a YA horror graphic novel that contains five “mysterious, spine-tingling” fairytale-esque short stories about “journeys into (and out of?) the eerie abyss.” (Goodreads)

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Comics Roundup #29: Zodiac Starforce | Elves | Monstress

Sadly, I’ve fallen so far behind on reviews that I’m still writing reviews of books I completed in April now. Today I have for you comic book reviews.

The first one, Zodiac Starforce, #1, I read for the O.W.L. Magical Readathon that was held in April. This review should have already been up, but no. I procrastinated, and now I’m posting it a month before the follow up readathon — N.E.W.T.s Magical Readathon — begins. The other two — Elves, Vol. 1 and Monstress, Vol. 2: The Blood — were both read for the Wyrd & Wonder readathon, which is a month-long readathon in May of all things fantasy.

Anyway, my intention this week is to clear out my review queue; so fingers crossed that I’ll actually achieve this.


Zodiac Starforce, #1 by Kevin Panetta, illus. by Paulina Ganucheau with colors by Savanna Ganucheau

Genre:

YA Fantasy

Series:

Zodiac Starforce, issue 1

Pubbed:

August 2015

Quick summary:

The series is about a group of teenage girls who possess magical powers and use them to protect their planet from dark creatures. This issue opens with the group disbanded and one of the members, Kim, hoping to get everyone back together again. While doing so, she’s also investigating a student’s disappearance and later learns, along with her group of superpower friends, that one of the group members is infected with dark energy. (Goodreads)

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Comics Roundup #28: Baba Yaga & a Dam Keeper

It’s been a while since I’ve posted a review of a comic book. Actually, it’s been a while since I’ve read a comic book. I haven’t done so since October last year. Well, I’ll rectify that with this post.

Here I have two graphic novels. The first is a YA fantasy story about a girl seeking the witch from folklore, Baba Yaga, because she no longer feels welcome at home, and the second continues a middle-grade fantasy story about a pig who manages his town’s dam to keep back a deadly black fog.


Baba Yaga’s Assistant by Marika McCoola, illus. by Emily Carroll

Genre:

YA fantasy

Pubbed:

August 2015

Quick overview:

When Masha sees an advertisement for an assistant position with the fearful witch from folklore, Baba Yaga, she decides to apply. Masha had recently lost her beloved grandmother, her source of love and support, leaving her with just her dad, who has found a new family.

Masha grew up listening to her grandmother’s stories about Baba Yaga, so she doesn’t balk at answering the advertisement and seeking out the witch. Afterall, Masha reasons, Baba Yaga may be a witch, “but she’s a grandma too.”

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