Comics Roundup #56: Wizard Beach & Moonstruck, Vol. 2

For this batch of comic book reviews, I’ll chat about two fantasy comics, one for the middle grade crowd and one for YA readers. Both were silly, fun reads that I enjoyed and liked the art.

I read both for Wyrd & Wonder in May.


Wizard Beach by Shaun Simon, illus. by Conor Nolan with colors by Meg Casey

Genre

MG Fantasy

Series

n/a

Pubbed

2019

From Goodreads

What do wizards and witches do when they need a break from the cold, ice-capped mountains of their homeland? They go to the beach, of course!

When Hexley Daggard Ragbottom, a high-strung young wizard, wants to put an end to the frost of dark forests he calls home, he seeks out his Uncle Salazar the greatest wizard of all time. But Uncle “Sally” has abandoned his old life for one of leisure, surfing and napping. Sally’s permanent vacation doesn’t sit well with Hexley, but maybe the young wizard is on the wrong mission. Maybe what “Hex” really needs is to learn how to chill out. (Goodreads)

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Comics Roundup #55: 1602 — Angela and Marvel

I know nothing about the superhero stories, so I didn’t realize Angela was from the Marvel superhero universe when I got this. I picked up 1602: Witch Hunter Angela purely because of the cover, and the title — I like stories about witches. It wasn’t until I started reading the bonus story — Marvel 1602, #1 by Neil Gaiman — included in this volume that I realize it’s about superheroes but set back in the early 1600s.


1602: Witch Hunter Angela by Marguerite Bennett & Kieron Gillen, illus. by Stephanie Hans with additional artwork by Marguerite Sauvage, Irene Koh & Jordie Bellaire, Frazer Irving, and Kody Chamberlain & Lee Loughridge

Genre

Historical Fiction; Fantasy

Series

Marvel 1602

Pubbed

2016

From Goodreads

In the altered realms of Battleworld, Angela and Sera are Witch Hunters, the scourges of King James’ England, 1602. In a land beset by magic and monstrosity, they seek a new and seductive evil-not witchbreed, but deal-making Faustians, who bargain with ancient creatures for unnatural power! Moral ambiguity? Fancy allusions? Marguerite making the most of that English degree?

Collecting: 1602: Witch Hunter, Angela 1-4, 1602 (Goodreads)

My thoughts

I had to read this one twice, which I usually do with comics to refresh my memory before reviewing them but with this one, I had to do a double read because I didn’t get the story my first time through. The plot was too episodic, and I couldn’t tell how Angela and her companion, Serah, were able to quickly identify the Faustians. And although I liked some of the mini-stories interjected throughout, they didn’t help to ease my confusion about the main plot.

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Comics Roundup #54: “Deadpool: World’s Greatest, Vol. 1”

I recently read a bunch of comics and managed to put a dent in my goal to read at least 20 comic books this year, so at the moment I’m pretty damn proud of myself. 😀

I’ve also gotten into reading comic books digitally, which I’m grudgingly loving because the illustrations show up a lot clearer onscreen, and I don’t have to worry about details getting lost as the page curves into the book’s spine. The colors also pop more when viewed on a device.

However, I do prefer to own physical copies of books, so the comics I tend to read digital versions of are ones I don’t own and probably wouldn’t buy physical copies of, like Deadpool: World’s Greatest, Vol. 1: Millionaire With a Mouth, which I recently read.


Deadpool: World’s Greatest, Vol. 1: Millionaire With a Mouth by Gerry Duggan, illus. by Mike Hawthorne, inked by Terry Pallot with colors by Val Staples (issues 1-2) and Guru-eFX (issues 3-5)

Genre

Sci-fi – superhero

Series

Deadpool: World’s Greatest

Pubbed

2016

From Goodreads

He’s annoying. He’s dangerous. He smells terrible. But the public loves him. That’s right-the Merc with the Mouth may make money for missions of murky morality…but he’s become the most popular hero in the world for it. Eat that, Spidey! The world belongs to…Deadpool. The fan-favorite team of Gerry Duggan and Mike Hawthorne return to bring Deadpool into his most successful adventures yet!

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Comics Roundup #53: “My Body in Pieces”

Although I received a copy of this book from NetGalley, it does not influence the thoughts and opinions I share about my reading experience below.

My Body in Pieces by Marie-Noëlle Hébert (illus.), transl. by Shelley Tanaka

Genre

Nonfiction — Memoir

Series

n/a

Pubbed

April 1, 2021

Goodreads summary

A deeply emotional graphic memoir of a young woman’s struggles with self-esteem and body image issues.

All Marie-Noëlle wants is to be thin and beautiful. She wishes that her thighs were slimmer, that her stomach lay flatter. Maybe then her parents wouldn’t make fun of her eating habits at family dinners, the girls at school wouldn’t call her ugly, and the boy she likes would ask her out. This all-too-relatable memoir follows Marie-Noëlle from childhood to her twenties, as she navigates what it means to be born into a body that doesn’t fall within society’s beauty standards.

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Comics Roundup #52: Lady S & Dragon Age

I’ll be a very happy reader if I manage to read at least two comics or graphic novels each month. Having read two in January makes me hopeful for how the rest of the year might go. I picked up the first volumes of Lady S. and Dragon Age, both of which I read electronically.

Although I love reading physical copies of comics, I’m getting used to the electronic versions. I just love how the lighting on my iPad causes the colors of the illustrations to pop. I also like the guided reading option available in the Comixology app, which enables you to read from panel to panel by zooming in on them. When I do that, I notice details I would have otherwise missed when reading from the full-page view. It’s highly possible that I might read more comics electronically, but I’ll continue collecting physical copies.


Lady S., Vol. 1: Here’s to Suzie by Jean Van Hamme, illus. by Philippe Aymond, transl. from the French by Jerome Saincantin

Genre

Mystery; Political Thriller

Series

Lady S

Pubbed

2004

Goodreads summary

Adopted daughter and principal collaborator of roving ambassador James Fitzroy, special correspondent for the American Secretary of State in Europe, Susan is a clever, multilingual young woman, in full bloom and perfectly happy in the eyes of an attentive father. But this too-perfect happiness hides many faults, sorrows and mysteries. Trapped by her past, Susan will have to play her most dangerous role in a life already rich with adventure: Lady S., high-class spy in a diplomatic environment. (Goodreads)

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Comics Roundup #51: The Wicked and the Divine, Vols. 1-9

Okay, so I messed up with this. I read through the entire Wicked + the Divine series back in November and loved it so much that I procrastinated on writing my thoughts on it. Now I’ve waited too long to do so and some of my reactions to what I read have faded from my memory. I regret that. I should have gotten to this sooner instead of punking out, too intimidated by my raving emotions at how much I enjoyed reading this series.

The Wicked + the Divine, Vols. 1-9 by Kieron Gillen, illus. by Jamie McKelvie, colored by Matthew Wilson

Genre

Fantasy

Series

Wicked + the Divine, Vols. 1-9

Pubbed

2014 (first volume)
2019 (last volume)

Quick summary

(based on what I wrote for my review of vols. 1-4)

The Wicked + The Divine is a fantasy comic book series set in present day U.K. about mythological gods who are incarnated as humans every ninety years but die after two years. This time, the gods appear as pop superstars. Everyone loves them and hates them and wants to be them. The story follows Laura, a teenager who yearns to be part of the Pantheon (the group of gods), as she gets tangled in the gods’ affairs — one of the gods is blamed for murdering a judge. Laura seeks to prove the god’s innocence while hoping to gain greater influence with them. (Goodreads)

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Comics Roundup #50: “In”

I received an e-ARC of this graphic novel through NetGalley. I’d never heard of the author/artist before doing so, but the description of the story interested me. As such, I wasn’t sure what to expect going in, and after the first couple pages, I thought I’d be bored and dislike the book. But, surprisingly, I liked it.

In by Will McPhail (illus.)

Genre

Contemporary

Series

n/a

Pub

May 18, 2021

Goodreads summary

A poignant and witty graphic novel by a leading New Yorker cartoonist, following a millennial’s journey from performing his life to truly connecting with people.

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Comics Roundup #49: “Adulthood Is a Myth”

The last two graphic novels I read in 2020 were lucky finds in my library’s Libby app collection. I first tried An Embarrassment of Witches by Sophie Goldstein and Jenn Jordan, which was a fun read, and then picked up this one because I’ve seen it mentioned by many bloggers and vloggers.

Adulthood Is a Myth by Sarah Andersen (illus.)

Genre

Humor

Series

Sarah’s Scribbles, book 1

Pubbed

2016

Goodreads summary

These casually drawn, perfectly on-point comics by the hugely popular young Brooklyn-based artist Sarah Andersen are for the rest of us. They document the wasting of entire beautiful weekends on the internet, the unbearable agony of holding hands on the street with a gorgeous guy, and dreaming all day of getting home and back into pajamas. In other words, the horrors and awkwardnesses of young modern life. Oh and they are totally not autobiographical. At all.

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Comics Roundup #48: “An Embarrassment of Witches”

Sometimes I go on my library’s Libby app just to browse what they have in their online collection. I was doing that one night when I stubbled upon An Embarrassment of Witches by Sophie Goldstein & Jenn Jordan. It’s a YA fantasy graphic novel about two young women navigating life after college and their changing friendship.

An Embarrassment of Witches by Sophie Goldstein (illus.) & Jenn Jordan

Genre

YA Fantasy

Series

n/a

Pubbed

2020

Goodreads summary

Life after college isn’t turning out exactly as Rory and Angela had planned. Rory, recently dumped at the gate of her flight to Australia, needs to find a new life path ASAP. What do you do with a B.A. in Communications and a minor in Southeast Asian Spellcraft? Maybe her cute new housemate Guy is the answer she’s looking for (spoiler alert: he isn’t).

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Comics Roundup #47: “Klaus: How Santa Claus Began”

I learned about this book from an Unbound Worlds post recommending sci-fi and fantasy books for Christmas. I’d link it, but Penguin Random House removed that website and now all blog posts, no matter the genre, appear on the main website… something like that. Anyway, that Unbound Worlds post convinced me that I NEEDED Klaus: How Santa Claus Began with this statement:

“And really, who doesn’t love a Santa who crafts all of his toys during an extended drug trip brought about by a hallucinogenic stew?”

Lol! I mean, yo! After reading that I had to find out what’s up with this Santa. So I bought the book (back in 2017) and waited 3 years to read it, lol!

Klaus: How Santa Claus Began by Grant Morrison, illus. by Dan Mora

Genre

Fantasy

Series

Klaus

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