Fandom Book Tag, Pt. 1

Soo… I wanted to focus on tags I was tagged for but when I looked at my long list of book tags, I realized that I failed to mark which ones I was tagged for. Oh well. I’ll just do them all at random.

I found the Fandom Book Tag over on My Tiny Obsessions and stowed it away to do one day (today!). I think I was more attracted to how Cristina formatted the post than interested in the tag itself, but it looks like fun so here I am and here it is.

The tag was created by Pia at Fangirl Fashionista. There are a lot of questions because of the many fandoms out there, so I decided to separate them into two posts.

Doctor Who: A book with a (mostly) blue cover.

Here, There Be Dragons by James A. Owen

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Seven Deadly Sins Book Tag

It’s book tag week!! 😀

Since I didn’t post anything yesterday, I’m doubling up today. (Good idea, me! **Pats self on back**)

My plan was to focus on tags I was tagged for but then I remember seeing this book tag over on Books and Drinks and immediately wanted to do it, mostly because I want to show off the cute illustrations of cats (not part of the tag but it was included in the post on Books and Drinks).

My eyes immediately zoomed to the illustrations when I saw the post. I googled them and learned from this Bored Panda post that they were created by game designer and illustrator Marija Tiurina, who teamed up with NeonMob, a platform for digital artists and collectors, to portray the seven deadly sins with cats.

After looking at the Bored Panda post, I went off on a tangent by visiting Tiurina’s website to look at more of her illustrations. I really like her style. It’s cartoony, but they are all sweet, cute, and fun, even the ones that have a sinister tone.

Anyway, I’m not here to discuss Tiurina’s art (though I’m tempted to do a post on her and her illustrations), so onward with the tag!

GREED: What is the most expensive book that you own? What is the least expensive book that you own?

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Anything but Books Tag

It’s about to be a book tag-filled week.

I’m pretty busy and am not in the mood to do any of the reviews I have planned, so I’ll do something fun instead, which means inundating my blog with tags everyday this week.

Positive perks: I’ll get caught up on things I’m tagged for.

Negative perks: I’ll annoy someone with all these tags because I might repeat books in a few. Oh well.

I’ll kick off tag week with the Anything But Books Tag, which was created by booktuber ReadorRot. I was tagged by the awesome Emily at Embuhlee liest, my buddy-reader in all things Robin Hobb.

Name a cartoon(s) that you love.

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“Things We Lost in the Fire” by Mariana Enriquez

I sometimes get intimidated by book reviews I must write. This is one of those times.

The intimidation usually arises because I love the book and have a lot to say but don’t know how to articulate my thoughts, such as now. I had lots to say when I completed this book but didn’t know how to make it all coherent. But the short of it is that this book is great and I highly recommend it.

Quick summary and My thoughts:

Things We Lost in the Fire is a book of short stories by Argentine journalist Mariana Enriquez. It was translated by Megan McDowell and published in the U.S. earlier this year by Hogarth Press. It’s the first book of short stories I’ve ever read and I’m glad that I had such a positive experience with it, which I didn’t expect because I thought I would be unsatisfied with the length. I wasn’t, but I wouldn’t mind reading an expanded version of some of the stories to know what the characters do next.

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“Wintersong” by S. Jae-Jones

I read Wintersong in tandem with Who Thought This Was a Good Idea because both became available on my library’s Overdrive at the same time. We are only given 21 days to read books downloaded to our devices, so I sped through both books. Good thing they were both somewhat engrossing.

Goodreads summary:

All her life, nineteen-year-old Liesl has heard tales of the beautiful, mysterious Goblin King. He is the Lord of Mischief, the Ruler Underground, and the muse around which her music is composed. Yet, as Liesl helps shoulder the burden of running her family’s inn, her dreams of composition and childish fancies about the Goblin King must be set aside in favor of more practical concerns.

But when her sister Käthe is taken by the goblins, Liesl journeys to their realm to rescue her sister and return her to the world above. The Goblin King agrees to let Käthe go—for a price. The life of a maiden must be given to the land, in accordance with the old laws. A life for a life, he says. Without sacrifice, nothing good can grow. Without death, there can be no rebirth. In exchange for her sister’s freedom, Liesl offers her hand in marriage to the Goblin King. He accepts.

Down in the Underground, Liesl discovers that the Goblin King still inspires her—musically, physically, emotionally. Yet even as her talent blossoms, Liesl’s life is slowly fading away, the price she paid for becoming the Goblin King’s bride. As the two of them grow closer, they must learn just what it is they are each willing to sacrifice: her life, her music, or the end of the world. (Goodreads)

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“Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?: And Other Questions You Should Have Answers to When You Work in the White House” by Alyssa Mastromonaco

Lately, it’s been hard to keep up with my reviews or remember what I want to say in them. I was more organized last year because I would jot down my thoughts soon after completing a book in my spiral-bound notebook. But at the beginning of this year, I was so lethargic and sluggish when it came to reading and blogging that I stopped recording my impression of what I read immediately after completing the book.

Most times I’m able to write a decent review despite not having recorded my initial thoughts. I highlight so many passages as I read that once I reread them, I’m able to recall why I highlighted it, how that portion of the book made me feel, and what that particular passage made me think. So a notebook isn’t necessarily needed, but it is helpful in easing the load of thoughts I store in mind as I read more and more books without posting reviews of them.

Such a notebook comes in handy when I read library e-books that disappear after its due date without me having posted a review. That’s what happened with Alyssa Mastromonaco’s memoir Who Thought This Was a Good Idea, which is about how she became the youngest woman to serve as deputy chief of staff at the White House.

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What’s On Your Nightstand: May 2017

What’s on Your Nightstand, is a monthly meme hosted by 5 Minutes for Books on the last Tuesday of every month that summarizes what you’ve read for the month, what you’re currently reading, and what you plan to read next. For my posts, I also include articles, music, art, TV shows, and whatever else I did in the month.

May was such an eventful and busy month, but a great one as well. My reading is back on track and life is full of bustling fun. I am happy and am looking toward the future with high hopes about what I can accomplish.

In this month, I noticed an improvement in my driving skills (I’m learning how to drive), made new friends, saved some money, and took a leap of faith that turned out well at the beginning of June (I’m vague here, but I’ll mention it some more in my June wrap-up).

I also committed to a natural journey for my hair (though at this moment, as I’m typing this post, I’m tempted to book an appointment to relax my hair and throw in some purple highlights), but it’s hard to remain committed so we’ll see what happens by the end of June. Anyway, here’s what happened this month:

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