Friday Face-Off: A Cover with ‘Curse’ in the Title

Friday Face-Off is a weekly meme that compares book covers to decide which is best. It was created by Books by Proxy and is now continued by Lynn’s Book Blog.

This week’s theme:

Unlucky for some

A cover with ‘curse’ in the title

After spending a couple minutes convinced that I don’t know any books with the word “curse” in the title despite the many fantasy and horror novels I know of or have read, I remembered my post for last week’s Top 5 Tuesday where I listed the series I’d love to complete. Lois McMaster Bujold’s World of the Five Gods was one of them.

I read The Curse of Chalion two years ago and loved it so much that I reread it by audio book about a month after completing the physical copy. It’s one of my favorite fantasy books. It’s about a veteran who returns home seeking a peaceful life but is instead thrown into the midst of political intrigue. I’ve since forgotten what drew me to this book, but I ended up liking it because of the writing and the protagonist and how gods and religion functions in the fantasy world. It was a good read.

I decided to go easy on myself for this week’s post and focus on just two covers. These are both covers for U.S. editions of the book. The first one, the one on the left, appears on my audio book but is sometimes the cover for physical editions of the novel, and the second one, on the right, is the cover of the physical edition I own.

FACE OFF!

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Friday Face-Off: Autumn Colors

Friday Face-Off is a weekly meme that compares book covers to decide which is best. It was created by Books by Proxy and is now continued by Lynn’s Book Blog.

This week’s theme:

“Warm September brings the fruit”

A cover that is seasonal for autumn/fall

This week’s theme reminds me of one of my BBC (Beautiful Book Covers) posts, where I selected a few covers that made me think of autumn. I chose from that selection for this post. I chose the book whose U.S. cover contains almost all the colors of autumn — Euphoria by Lily King.

I’ve never read Euphoria, so I have no idea what it’s about. But apparently, it’s inspired by true events and is about a woman who “changed the way we understand the world,” and there are some anthropology bits in it.

Let’s first compare the U.S. and U.K. covers.

FACE OFF!

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Friday Face-Off: I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

Friday Face-Off is one of my favorite bookish memes. It focuses on book covers, more specifically different versions of a book cover, to judge which one is best. It was created by Books by Proxy and is now continued by Lynn’s Book Blog. So shout out to Lynn for continuing it! For a while now I wanted to jump back in but kept forgetting to. But this time, Friday will not pass by without me publishing a Friday Face-Off post!

This week’s theme:

“I wandered lonely as a cloud”

A cover that is predominantly yellow

My thoughts immediately went to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone when I saw this topic because the 20th anniversary editions were released in the house colors and although I consider myself a Ravenclaw, my favorite of the bunch was the yellow covers for Hufflepuff because the publisher used a brilliant yellow for those books. But I talk (and think) about the Harry Potter books too much, so I instead decided to feature Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings, which appears in such a yellow.

Although James is one of my favorite authors, I’ve yet to read this book (or any of his others except the one I read) and haven’t even cracked open his debut fantasy novel Black Leopard, Red Wolf, which I was beyond excited to see published earlier this year, smh. A Brief History of Seven Killings is a historical fiction novel about the attempted assassination of the popular Jamaican singer Bob Marley in the late 1970s. Let’s first look at the cover I have verses the one I want.

FACE OFF!

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“The Little Red Wolf by Amélie Fléchais” (illus.), transl. by Jeremy Melloul

The first picture book I read this year gives me a story about a little wolf in a red cloak travelling through the wood to visit his grandmother.

What does that remind you of?

Genre:

Children’s fantasy

Pubbed:

June 2014

Quick overview:

The Little Red Wolf is a children’s picture book that’s inspired by Charles Perrault’s fairytale Little Red Riding Hood.

It was originally published in French but was translated to English by Jeremy Melloul. The English version was published in October 2017. (Goodreads)

My thoughts:

I didn’t know what I was getting into when I borrowed this book from the library, but I was delighted by what I read. I became aware of the book through booktube so when I saw it at the library, I grabbed it.

The Little Red Wolf gives us a Little Red Riding Hood story with a twist — it’s from the perspective of a wolf. I don’t believe that’s a spoiler since you can deduce that much from the cover. It’s a sweet, charming tale about a little wolf travelling through the forest to his grandmother’s home to bring her some food since she has lost all her teeth and can no longer hunt.

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“Behind the Canvas” by Alexander Vance

I forgot where I first heard of this book. It must have been on a booktube channel or while perusing Book Outlet for books to buy. It’s weird, but a few of the books on my Goodreads TBR were added because I saw them on Book Outlet but didn’t want to purchase them at the time. Basically, I was drawn to them because of the cover or, in this case, the title.

I love art and enjoy visiting art museums. I’ve often thought it would be cool to read a fantasy novel where the protagonist has to enter paintings and pictures; so when I saw the title of this book and read the synopsis, I got excited. It’s the type of story I’ve daydreamed about.

Genre:

Middle-grade fantasy

Pubbed:

2016

Quick overview:

Behind the Canvas is a stand-alone middle-grade fantasy novel about a girl named Claudia Miravista who loves art but has no close friends. While on a fieldtrip to a local art museum in her hometown in Illinois, she notices a boy with bright blue eyes in a painting. But when she points him out to two of her classmates, she realizes he has disappeared.

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BBC #5: Boxed Sets

Christmas is almost here!! 😀 I’ve decided to do a holiday-themed BBC post. BBC is a meme I started where I feature books with beautiful covers. For this edition, I’ll focus on boxed sets, which are great gifts for book lovers, especially if it’s a boxed set of a series the person loves.

This post is a little late, but there’s still some time left to shop for gifts before Christmas hits!

Wildwood Chronicles by Colin Meloy, illus. by Carson Ellis

Wildwood
Under Wildwood
Wildwood Imperium

cover art by Carson Ellis

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BBC #4: Autumn Colors

This edition of BBC, a meme I started where I feature books with beautiful covers, will focus on the robust colors of autumn.

I love autumn colors. They are rich and majestic. When I walk among trees donned in fall colors, I feel as if I’m walking among royalty about to partake in autumnal festivities. I love the mustard yellows, dark greens, plums, burnt oranges, maroons, and rich, warm browns. Ahh… Autumn. It hasn’t yet fully arrived in my part of the world, but I feel tendrils of it in the air as it slowly creeps in.

To herald it’s coming, here are some book covers in autumnal covers.

Before the Feast by Saša Stanišić, trans. from German by Anthea Bell

cover art by Claire Scully

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Handwriting Challenge

I enjoy writing by hand because I admire my own handwriting, so this tag was perfect for me. I was tagged for it last year by Sara Letourneau and though I’ve considered doing it many times since then, it’s only now that I’ve found the time to sit and write out the answers.

The answers aren’t long, but these days I don’t write by hand as much as I used to. It’s much quicker to type something and either send or print it. I write notes by hand and other short trivial things that quickly come to mind, but otherwise everything is typed, especially if it’s something long. My thoughts race when I’m writing — whether a blog post, or story, or letter, — so it’s best that I type so I can keep up with them. My hands also grow tired less quickly when I type than write if what I’m working on something long.

But I still enjoy writing by hand and will sometimes recopy notes I initially typed by hand (which, I guess, is working backwards) so I can admire my handwriting while committing the notes to memory. I remember things better when I write instead of type them, and I see handwriting as a work of art. So yea, I was quite vain while doing this post. I admired myself while writing out my answers and even liked my attempts to cover up the mistakes I made.

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BBC #3: Favorite Fantasy Book Covers

I’m the worst at keeping up with memes. I’m so bad at them that I even forgot to keep up with my own meme that I created to focus on one my favorite things about books — book covers!

I created BBC (Beautiful Book Covers meme) last year to feature and talk about book covers I love. My plan was to make BBC a monthly meme but after the second post, I totally forgot about it. I’m just horrible at sticking to a schedule or remembering what memes I’m participating in. I easily get distracted by the shiny, new one to come along.

Well, a few days ago I was reminded of my meme when I saw Beth’s (Bethan May Books) post on fantasy book covers she likes. The idea popped into my head to do a similar post and use it for my neglected meme. Well, here it is. There are loads of fantasy book covers I like so this will be a multi-part post with others posted in the future.


The Fox and the Star was the first book to pop in my mind when I considered this topic, though it’s more fairytale/folklore than hardcore fantasy like the Lord of the Rings series. Drawn to the vintage feel of The Fox and the Star cover design, I decided to choose similar cover designs for this post. The following are the few that quickly came to mind.

The Fox and the Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith

Cover art by Coralie Bickford-Smith

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Comics Roundup #22: “Audubon: On the Wings of the World”

With this, I complete a second book published by Nobrow Press. I own a few books by this publisher on my bookshelves, but it’s my nature to pay more attention to books I don’t own. Hence the two book I’ve read by this publisher were both borrowed from the library. But I don’t mind that. I’m just happy that I’ve finally read books published by Nobrow Press to confirm that they are one of my favorite publishers. I’ve always admired the books they feature on their IG account and now it seems that I’ll probably always like their content. 😊


Audubon: On the Wings of the World by Fabien Grolleau, illus. by Jérémie Royer, trans. by Etienne Gilfillan

Genre:

Nonfiction: biography

Pubbed:

2016

Quick summary:

Audubon: On the Wings of the World is a biography of John James Audubon (born Jean-Jacques Audubon in Haiti in 1785), the noted artist, naturalist, and ornithologist most known for his book Birds of America, which contains 435 paintings of different species of birds in America observed in their natural habitat. Written and illustrated by Fabien Grolleau and Jeremie Royer, respectively, this graphic novel portrays Audubon as a passionate, determined man striving to paint and record all the birds of America in the 1800s.

Though Audubon’s persistence and efforts are admirable, the book does not shy away from showing less savory aspects of the man, such as his disdain for his mentor Alexander Wilson, the long lengths of time he spent away from his wife and children as he pursued his passion, the immense debt he gained from failed business ventures, and that he hunted and killed many birds in his pursuit to document and study them.

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