BBC #2: Splash of Color

I’m back with another edition of BBC, a new meme I started where I feature books with beautiful covers. Along with reading books, I admire the covers and sometimes determine what to buy or read next by how much I like the cover. There are many things that draw my attention to a cover, but for this post, I’ll focus on color, or more specifically,

splashes of color

On the covers below are blotches, splotches, drips, and dribbles of color that give the illusion of paint: as if the designer intentionally or carelessly threw the colors on the cover while puzzling out what the design should be.

The first featured cover is:

The Impossible Fairy Tale by Han Yujoo

Cover by Kapo Ng

The Impossible Fairy Tale is the first novel by Korean author Han Yujoo to be translated into English. (It was translated by Janet Hong.) I haven’t read the novel, but the Goodreads summary and related reviews describe it as an “eerie, unpredictable” novel about two 12-year-old girls, one who’s “lucky” and another who’s seemingly unremarkable and only referred to as the Child, whose lives are intertwined.

The eye-catching cover designed by Kapo Ng caught my attention and convinced me to lead this post with it. I love the riot of colors spreading across the cover. It makes me think of an artist’s palette, or rather, the splatter of color that would fall on the floor and desks of my art classes back in school. The blots of colors here are so captivating that I almost miss the hidden images in them, which makes me want to continue staring at the cover to see what else I’ll find.

Firebird series:
A Thousand Pieces of You
Ten Thousand Skies Above You
A Million Worlds With You
by Claudia Gray
Covers by Craig Shields

A young-adult science-fiction series about a girl who chases his father’s killer through multiple dimensions.

I’ve considered reading this series because of its breathtaking covers. Designed by Craig Shields, the covers are often referred to as a “work of art,” which fits the story because the protagonist is a painter. I like the covers because of the watercolor effect, seen in how the bright blots fade into the white background at its edges, and because we see glimpses of cities in the color blots.

According to this interview with the lead designer, Alison Klapthor, including cities in the blots was intentional because the author wanted there to be “a visual juxtaposition of the worlds and different times in history” that the protagonist travels to. I’ve never seen these covers in real life, so I did not know that the cover is also textured to resemble watercolor paper. I learned that from the interview and began to notice it in the covers thereafter.

What’s a Soulmate? by Lindsey Ouimet

Cover by Jay Aheer

A young-adult romance novel about a smart girl who falls in love with a “bad” boy — he’s in a juvenile detention facility.

This isn’t my sort of story, so I wouldn’t read it; but I sure love the cover, so I’ll admire that. Similar to the Firebird series covers above, What’s a Soulmate cover resembles a painting. But, while the Firebird series covers are watercolor, this strikes me more as acrylic that has dried some.

I love all the little effects in this cover, like the contrast of colors, which make me wonder why the guy’s part is in color and the girl’s is dark and gray; the flow of the colors in the guy’s part, which seem as much affected by the wind as the guy’s scarf; the illusion of a light source under the title; and the splotches and dried drips of color.

Cold Summer by Gwen Cole

Cover by Sammy Yuen

A young-adult science-fiction novel about a high-school dropout named Kale Jackson who is unable to control his time-traveling ability, which shunts him to World War II, where he is a sharpshooter. Because of this experience, Kale suffers from PTSD in the present, which strains his relationship with his friends, family, and the “ex-girl-next-door” he likes.

I haven’t read this, in case you’re wondering. Unfortunately, this resolution of the cover isn’t as great as I’d like, but you can see that it is lovely in its simplicity. There isn’t much in this cover, but it catches my attention nonetheless. Though the colors are a bit muted (I wonder if it looks the same in real life), they are what interests the customer/viewer and helps to contrast the two figures, which seem to be a girl and a boy.

I like how the colors blend into each other and drain into the white of the background. This too makes me think of watercolor, though the first time I saw the cover I thought of pastels because of the gritty texture in parts of it.

Coffee Boy by Austin Chant

Cover by Natasha Snow

A romance novel about an out, trans man named Kieran who’s interning on a political campaign, where he’s privy to the drama of the “humorless campaign strategist,” Seth, who has a crush on their straight boss. “But when Seth proves to be as respectful and supportive as he is prickly, Kieran develops an awkward crush of his own — one which Seth is far too prim and proper to ever reciprocate.”

Here’s another simple cover that I like. I haven’t read the book, so I do not know how well the title matches the story, but I like that the cover matches the “coffee” in the title. To me, the texture of the cover makes me think of a slightly rumpled napkin and the splotch of color is the spill of a drink. It makes me think of Starbucks.


That’s it for BBC #2.

I hope you found here new books with great covers to go read. 🙂

“Sick” by Christa Wojciechowski

I read this one out of curiosity.

Lilyn over at SciFi and Scary read and reviewed it last year. She was so repulsed by the story that she was conflicted on how to write the review. My curiosity was instantly perked. It made we wonder why she had such a strong reaction to the story and if I would react the same too. But after reading, I understood.

Amazon summary:

A woman sacrifices everything to care for her husband whose chronic illness can’t be diagnosed. Susan Branch’s life revolves around the care of her charming and inscrutable husband John, a man born into wealth and prestige who lost his family’s fortune when his mysterious chronic illnesses left him bedridden. Together they live a decrepit existence beholden to the current owners of his family’s former estate.

After years of devoting herself to John’s care, Susan is worn out and frustrated. Yet she is determined to scrape together whatever resources she can to keep John comfortable and happy. This includes stealing Demerol from the doctor’s office where she works to feed John’s ever-increasing need for pain medication. As John’s condition continues to puzzle doctors, Susan begins to notice strange objects appearing around her house. Ever wary of creepy Old Pete, the groundskeeper, Susan decides to confront the elderly man and put an end to his snooping for good.

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“Normal” by Warren Ellis

The cover made me to pick this up.

I’d seen it on a previous visit to the library. Thinking it to be a horror novel, I avoided it. On another visit, the cover again caught my interest and curious, I read the synopsis on the back. “Sci-fi,” I thought. “Pweh!” I don’t like sci-fi and sometimes the concepts discussed scare me more than the horror novels. Again, I didn’t bother to check out the book.

But the third time I saw it on the shelf, I was again curious, sci-fi or not, and decided to just read the first sentence:

“Hand over the entire internet now and nobody gets hurt,” she said, aiming the toothbrush at the nurse like an evil magic wand.

Since then I was hooked and hardly put the book down until I was done.

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Weekend Reads #75: My Poor Vocab

It’s been a while since I’ve had the time to sit, think, and draft a Weekend Reads post, a weekly post in which I discuss a variety of topics and mention the books I plan to read on the weekend.

This weekend’s topic is from one of Sara LeTourneau’s Weekly Writer Wisdom posts:

How do you encourage the expansion of your vocabulary and the maturation of your writing style? For example, do you look up definitions of words you’ve never heard of before? Or “collect” words by writing them in a journal? Do you use writing prompts or exercises as a means of stretching your “language muscles”? What other thoughts or ideas does this quote bring to mind?

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Days of the Week Book Tag

Hello everyone:

Life has been surprisingly busy lately. A whole week has passed since I last posted something or read someone’s blog post. My hope was that August would be a bit slower, allowing me to catch up on here, but that hasn’t happened. However reading-wise, all is good. I’m participating in Tome Topple, which is going on right now, and have completed 1 tome so far.

Since it’s been a while since I posted something, I’ve decided to do a book tag! My plan was to do the Days of the Week Book Tag that I found on a blog back in June, but it seems that the blog was deleted so I googled the tag and found various versions of it. So, in classic Zezee fashion, I shall do them all! 😆

Starting with this tag created by Tera at Adventures Between Pages:
Secret Book Sunday
What book or series do you secretly love that you don’t always tell people?

I don’t think I have any books for this. I talk about all the books I read on here and review everything as well. I guess the only thing that fits this is that I sometimes read funny adult-content webcomics, like Oglaf, which I never mention on here because I sometimes discuss kids books and putting those two together don’t fit.

Mash-up Monday
Which two books or series do you think would be cool if they were mashed up as one book or series?

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey

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August Readathons | Tome Topple, Reading Quest, Bout of Books

Aentee, the creative bloggess behind Read at Midnight, has created another awesome readathon that I want to participate in (and will actually read books for).

Last year at the height of the Pokemon Go craze, she hosted the Pokemon Indigo League #ReadThemAllThon, which greatly appealed to me because I loved the Pokemon TV show. I made a TBR for the Pokemon readathon but didn’t have time to read any of the books, so I failed. But that won’t happen this time! I intend to be a Mage by the end of this Reading Quest.

Let me back up and explain.

This year Aentee is hosting a Reading Quest, where readers (I’ll call us “heroes”) embark on a journey to conquer their TBR pile through a series of stages. The quest is for 4 weeks, starting Sunday, August 13, and ending Sunday, September 10.

Heroes must choose one of the following paths:

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What’s On Your Nightstand: July 2017

What’s on Your Nightstand is a monthly meme hosted by 5 Minutes for Books on the last Tuesday of every month that summarizes what you’ve read for the month, what you’re currently reading, and what you plan to read next. For my posts, I also include articles, music, art, TV shows, and whatever else I did in the month.

I’m now convinced that the year sped up in the summer. Didn’t summer just start and already we’re in August reeling toward its end. All my plans for summer, which boils down to lots of time spent outside reading, has yet to come to fruition. July was mainly spent developing professionally and doing a bit of travel for work, which was fun until I realized I was close to Disney World but couldn’t visit. I’ve always wanted to go there. It was an even busier month than June and it went by in the blink of an eye. Hopefully, August will be a little slower.

Weirdly, I got a lot of reading done in July despite being busy (the traveling helped); but I didn’t blog as much because there was no time to write posts. Even now I find it hard to find time to write stuff, so I have to create my posts whenever the time presents itself and schedule them to publish. That scheduling tool is so helpful! I also fell behind on visiting blogs but hopefully that will be rectified in August. August will be all about reading.

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