Down the TBR Hole #6: It’s Been a While…

Here’s another edition of Down the TBR Hole, a meme created by Lia at Lost in a Story where we decide whether to keep or remove books on our TBR.

The rules for Down the TBR Hole:
  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

I’ve switched it up some and will only list the books I plan to remove from my Goodreads TBR. Those with a green Kick Off are ones I’ll probably change my mind on and read at some point.

Batch #1

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“Dread Nation” by Justina Ireland

Another surprising read I didn’t expect to enjoy.

I’d given up on YA books because I became annoyed that they were mostly romance novels touted as other genres. Whether they are categorized as fantasy or horror or sci-fi, the main focus of the story is always the romance and often it is the weakest part of the story. Because of that, I stopped reading YA books for a while. But the few rave reviews I’ve seen of Dread Nation, as well as this article, got me curious and made me want to read the book. So I did.

Genre:

Historical fiction — alternative history; Horror (it’s not scary)

Pubbed:

2018

Goodreads summary:

Jane McKeene was born two days before the dead began to walk the battlefields of Gettysburg and Chancellorsville—derailing the War Between the States and changing America forever. In this new nation, safety for all depends on the work of a few, and laws like the Native and Negro Reeducation Act require certain children attend combat schools to learn to put down the dead. But there are also opportunities—and Jane is studying to become an Attendant, trained in both weaponry and etiquette to protect the well-to-do. It’s a chance for a better life for Negro girls like Jane. After all, not even being the daughter of a wealthy white Southern woman could save her from society’s expectations.

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“Geekerella” by Ashley Poston

I’m surprised I enjoyed this as much as I did.

Genre:

Contemporary; Romance

Pubbed:

2017

Goodreads summary:

Cinderella goes to the con in this fandom-fueled twist on the classic fairy tale.

Part romance, part love letter to nerd culture, and all totally adorbs, Geekerella is a fairy tale for anyone who believes in the magic of fandom. Geek girl Elle Wittimer lives and breathes Starfield, the classic sci-fi series she grew up watching with her late father. So when she sees a cosplay contest for a new Starfield movie, she has to enter. The prize? An invitation to the ExcelsiCon Cosplay Ball, and a meet-and-greet with the actor slated to play Federation Prince Carmindor in the reboot. With savings from her gig at the Magic Pumpkin food truck (and her dad’s old costume), Elle’s determined to win…unless her stepsisters get there first.

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What’s on Your Nightstand: April 2018

What’s on Your Nightstand is a monthly meme hosted by 5 Minutes for Books on the last Tuesday of every month that summarizes what you’ve read for the month, what you’re currently reading, and what you plan to read next. For my posts, I also include articles, music, art, TV shows, and whatever else I did in the month.

April: the month in which I realize I’ve been decieving myself this whole time about accomplishing personal goals. April: the month in which I realize my setbacks are actually MAJOR setbacks and I probably won’t accomplish my goals by my appointed date. This was disappointing and dampened my month some, but April was also filled with lots of fun moments: enjoying the arts with friends or just by myself.

April wasn’t all bad and realizing those major setbacks now is actually a good thing. It’s still early in the year and though I’ll have to adjust the timeline for my goals, there’s still time to correct the mistakes I made so I won’t have to do a huge reshuffling of my plans. April was a busy month. I had lots to do at work and because I enjoy my job, the busyness was invigorating. I also reconnected with some friends, attended a parody of the Harry Potter books, which was loads of fun, and got a private tour of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, which, if you’re in D.C. and you love art, you should totally do too.

So it was a decent month, though I’ll continue to gripe about it because GRRR!!! I fucked up with them goals. At least my reading and blogging were on track. Here’s what I read in April.

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“The Golden Fool” by Robin Hobb

This is my favorite book by Robin Hobb.

I’m buddy-reading the Realm of the Elderlings books with Emily from Embuhlee liest and am enjoying them so much! They are entertaining and moving reads and whenever I complete one, I have to take a break to reflect on the story before moving on.

That’s what I did with this book and because I loved it so much, it took me a longer time before I could jot down my thoughts. I couldn’t organize them. I kept jumping from scene to scene in my mind, still excited and giddy about what happened and what’s to come in the next book. So my review below will be nothing but gushing about this book and exclaiming about unexpected plot twists that I didn’t see coming.

Genre:

Fantasy

Pubbed:

October 2002

Goodreads summary:

The second book in Robin Hobb’s thrilling fantasy series returns readers to the Six Duchies and the magical world of the Fitz and the Fool.

Fitz has been persuaded back to court, posing as a servant to the decadent Lord Golden (who is the Fool in disguise). In secret, he will train Prince Dutiful in the magic known as the Skill.

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“The Oddling Prince” by Nancy Springer

It wasn’t what I expected.

I requested an ARC copy from the publisher through NetGalley because the premise sounded interesting and the cover and title were appealing.

Genre:

Fantasy

Pubbed:

May 15, 2018 by Tachyon Publications

Quick summary:

The Oddling Prince was an interesting read and a bit different from the YA fantasy novels that are popular these days. The story, set “in the ancient moors of Scotland,” focuses on Aric, prince of Calidon and heir to the throne. Aric is the only child of his parents. When the story begins, his ailing father is nearing death because of a weird ring that won’t come off his finger. The ring appeared suddenly on his finger one day while out riding. It seems to be draining the king of his vitality.

But at the moment when death is about to sweep the king away, a stranger magically appears, seemingly out of nowhere, and saves the king by removing the ring. The king is immediately healed, or so it seems, and the stranger, who seems fey in appearance, claims to be the king’s son. The king denies this. All members of the castle shy away from the fey stranger, named Albaric, because of his inhuman beauty but Aric and his mother, the queen, quickly and easily accept the stranger.

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Shakespearean Insults

Here’s something fun for your Friday afternoon.

I was recently contacted by Invaluable, an online marketplace for fine art, antiques, and collectibles, to feature their Shakespearean Insult Generator created to celebrate the 402nd anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth and death on April 23rd. Below, I’ve included a blurb from Invaluable that gives some more info on the generator and shared some of my favorites.


Those who love Shakespeare know that his writing can pack a punch! Whether you’ve read all of his works or haven’t touched his plays since your high-school English class, if you’re a bookworm you know that Shakespeare has made huge contributions to the literary world.

To celebrate his legacy, Invaluable created a generator full of Shakespearean insults. Their tool compiles Shakespeare’s top insults from his most well-known works like Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and The Taming of the Shrew. Next time you wish to put someone in their place, step your game up by using one of these hilarious Shakespearean insults!

I’ll find a reason to use this today:

The next time someone tells me to sell all my books:

To Trump:

Check out Invaluable’s Shakespearean Insult Generator to see more. You can set filters based on whom you’d like to insult (lol).


A bit unrelated, but y’all know I love to read articles and interesting posts about books, reading, and art. Well, Invaluable has a wonderful blog dedicate to all things art and I just peeped this post about the benefits of art on memory and creativity that I had to share. Basically, taking time to appreciate art (whether viewing or creating it) helps to relieve stress and increases feelings of empathy, among other things. It’s a short article with some cool infographics. I recommend that you check it out too.