What’s On Your Nightstand: May 2017

What’s on Your Nightstand, is a monthly meme hosted by 5 Minutes for Books on the last Tuesday of every month that summarizes what you’ve read for the month, what you’re currently reading, and what you plan to read next. For my posts, I also include articles, music, art, TV shows, and whatever else I did in the month.

May was such an eventful and busy month, but a great one as well. My reading is back on track and life is full of bustling fun. I am happy and am looking toward the future with high hopes about what I can accomplish.

In this month, I noticed an improvement in my driving skills (I’m learning how to drive), made new friends, saved some money, and took a leap of faith that turned out well at the beginning of June (I’m vague here, but I’ll mention it some more in my June wrap-up).

I also committed to a natural journey for my hair (though at this moment, as I’m typing this post, I’m tempted to book an appointment to relax my hair and throw in some purple highlights), but it’s hard to remain committed so we’ll see what happens by the end of June. Anyway, here’s what happened this month:

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What’s On Your Nightstand: April 2017

What’s on Your Nightstand, is a monthly meme hosted by 5 Minutes for Books on the last Tuesday of every month that summarizes what you’ve read for the month, what you’re currently reading, and what you plan to read next. For my posts, I also include articles, music, art, TV shows, and whatever else I did in the month.

I’ve been struggling with my reading since the beginning of the year, but it picked up this month. Finally, I’ve started to read books that capture my attention and no longer do I feel like hopping from book to book. But though my reading took a positive turn this month, I was ill for most of it due to my allergies reacting to the pollen in the air.

I’ve spent almost all of April with a stuffy nose, itchy throat, headache, a cough, and sometimes a fever. I took a break from blogging a couple weeks ago because I was too weak to do much, returned because I felt better, but now I’m sick again, though not as much as last time. I now realize that doctors give good advice and I should have rested, as my doctor had prescribed (I’m stubborn so I often don’t do as I’m told). Anyway, back to the fun stuff.

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What’s On Your Nightstand: March 2017

What’s on Your Nightstand, is a monthly meme hosted by 5 Minutes for Books on the last Tuesday of every month that summarizes what you’ve read for the month, what you’re currently reading, and what you plan to read next. For my posts, I also include articles, music, art, TV shows, and whatever else I did in the month.

My reading trend so far is pretty erratic. I began the year in a slump, went on a reading high in February, and was burnt out by March (kinda). I completed one book, but I currently have many on the go. I couldn’t decide on what to read next, so I kept starting books. Hopefully I’ll complete one of them in April.

Book read:

The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold is a new favorite. I’ve mentioned it a lot on here since reading it. It’s a high fantasy novel about a man who gets caught up in the plans of the gods and tangled in the politics of his land. It’s a wonderful read that I increasingly liked the more I learned about its magic system, which is influenced by the gods: The gods must use human conduits to effect change in that world. I’m eager to read more of Bujold’s books and the other novels in this series. If you haven’t yet read The Curse of Chalion, I highly recommend you do so.

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A Legend Has Passed: Gloria Naylor

Gloria Naylor (January 1950 - September 2016)

Gloria Naylor (January 1950 – September 2016)

I am late with this post. More than two weeks have passed since Gloria Naylor died, but I couldn’t let her passing go by without making a note of it on this blog. Gloria Naylor, a noted African-American writer best known for her novel The Women of Brewster Place, died from heart failure on September 28 near her home in the Virgin Islands. She was 66.

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Bookish News Roundup: February 2016

Will I ever be on time with these posts? I’m starting to doubt it. Anyways, here are some noteworthy happenings in the book world that were discussed in February.

Simon & Schuster Launched a Muslim Imprint

On February 24, Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing announced that they will launch a new imprint called Salaam Reads, which will focus on Muslim-themed children’s books. The books will be geared toward all ages and will include picture books as well as middle-grade and young-adult novels.

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A Legend Has Passed: Harper Lee

Harper Lee (April 1926 — February 2016)

Harper Lee (April 1926 — February 2016)

I faintly remember the day I picked up Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird to read. It was the summer before sixth grade and I had read all the books I owned so I scoured my parents’ bookshelves for something new. The memory of the day and Lee’s story has faded from my memory, but I recall that I was so intrigued by the story that I completed the book in two days.

I didn’t know what significance the story carried. It was just something to read on a slow summer day. But I remember that I was touched by its contents and choked up a bit while reading. That’s the only experience I’ve had with Lee’s work. Since the release of the controversial Go Set a Watchman, I’ve debated returning to Lee’s books. I would like to re-experience her first novel and read the second for myself to see what it is about. But I have been skeptical about Go Set a Watchman because part of me believes that she was forced into publishing it. After all, she had avoided the media for years and had refused to publish another book after To Kill a Mockingbird.

I was sorry to learn that Harper Lee had passed. She died on February 19 in her hometown, Monroeville, AL. She was 89. With To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee so impacted literary canon that her novel became a staple on many high-school literature reading lists. It also won the Pulitzer Prize in fiction in 1961, a year after it was published. Though she will be missed, her work will continue to endure and she will be remembered.

May her soul rest in peace.

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Book News Roundup: Prizes, Censorship, Bans, and Sequels

It’s been a while since I’ve done one of these posts and it probably would have been a while longer before I did one but the Man Booker Prize Winner was recently announced and I’m excited about it so I thought I’d share the good news. Guess who won?

Marlon James won the 2015 Man Booker Prize

Marlon James Man Booker Prize

If you’ve read my recent posts, then you’re not surprised that I’m excited about this. On Tuesday, October 13, it was announced that James’s recent novel, A Brief History of Seven Killings, was named winner of the Man Booker Prize.

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