Try a Chapter Tag, Pt. 2

I’ve always wanted to do another round of the Try a Chapter Tag (here’s my first one), so I’m glad to finally get another chance to do it. I recently completed the 2 books I’ve been actively reading and am now looking for 2 more to start on. (I tend to juggle 3 these days.) Since I’m long overdue to read the ARCs and other recently published books I won in giveaways, I’ve decided to use this tag to choose two ARCs/recently pubbed books to read next.

The tag was created by Malia at BookParadise, a booktuber. The guidelines are as follows:

Choose 5+ books you’ve been meaning to read.
Read up to the first chapter, prologue included.
Decide if you’ll complete it or set it aside.
Here are the books I’ll choose from.

Some of these were published earlier this year so I’ll include the publication dates below.

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Comics Roundup #17: “Wolf Children”

A while back, I read a review of Wolf Children that made me seek to experience the story myself. Since I couldn’t find a place online to watch it, I decided to get the manga and read it. I was drawn to the beautiful illustrations but, as with all my book purchases, I immediately forgot about it once I shelved it in my bookcase.

It wasn’t until the Tome Topple Readathon rolled around that I sought it out to read for a challenge — Read a graphic novel (over 500 pages). I was glad to finally read the book after being curious about it for so long and sample its beautiful art.


Wolf Children: Ame & Yuki by Mamoru Hosoda, art by Yu, character design by Yoshiyuki Sadamoto, trans. by Jocelyne Allen

Genre: I don’t know

Quick summary:

Wolf Children is about a woman who falls in love with a man who is half wolf, the last of his kind. Circumstances lead her to raise their two children on her own, which she does with great patience and care. She never complains despite the difficulties she encounters in raising half-wolf children, but instead faces her challenges with optimism and a smile.

The children are complete opposites of each other. As a child, the older sibling, Yuki, is a spirited girl who loves to explore and experience new things and is driven by her curiosity about the world. In contrast, her young brother, Ame, is introspective, quiet, observant, and most of all, cautious. However as the two mature, their experiences lead them to choose unexpected paths.

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“This One Summer” by Mariko Tamaki, illus. by Jillian Tamaki

This One SummerGenre:

Contemporary; young adult

Goodreads overview:

Rose and her parents have been going to Awago Beach since she was a little girl. It’s her summer getaway, her refuge. Her friend Windy is always there, too, like the little sister she never had, completing her summer family.

But this summer is different.

Rose’s mom and dad won’t stop fighting, and Rose and Windy have gotten tangled up in a tragedy-in-the-making in the small town of Awago Beach. It’s a summer of secrets and heartache, and it’s a good thing Rose and Windy have each other.

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Comics Roundup #7: monk — keys

Rasputin, Vol. 1Rasputin, Vol. 1: The Road to the Winter Palace by Alex Grecian, illus. by Riley Rossmo

Genre:

Supernatural

Quick summary:

A supernatural retelling of Rasputin’s story. Rasputin was a member of the Romanov court under Nicholas II’s monarchy in Russia. He served as an adviser and healer for he was the only person who was able to cure prince Alexie, who was a hemophiliac. However, Rasputin was given the moniker “mad monk” because it’s purported that he was crazy. His actions were extreme, unusual, and sometimes cruel.

In this comic, Russian folklore is mixed with history to provide a backstory for Rasputin and an explanation for his odd personality and abilities. He is a healer in this story, but that ability is pushed a little further because he’s able to revive those who are at the edge of life. However, each time that Rasputin revives someone, he takes a bit of that person with him, hence his varied personality.

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Weekend Reads #49: More Thoughts on Jane Eyre

Weekend Reads is a weekly discussion on a variety of topics. At the end of the post, I’ll include what I plan to read on the weekend.

Yea, I got more to say on this book.

In my last discussion on Jane Eyre, I spoke about how Rochester was disabled to atone for his sins and to be humbled and tamed for Jane. This time I want to focus on St. John who, despite his piousness, is one of the most horrible characters in the story.

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Comics Roundup #6: I try some single issues

And they were okay, but one stood out from the rest. However, this experiment with single issues made me realize that I don’t like them. They’re too short. I prefer to read the bind-up of issues in a volume so the story continues for a while before it stops. I think I reacted this way to single issues because I’m not used to reading comics and am coming to them from reading books, which are much longer.

I read these during the spring, in April and May, when I teetered on the edge of a reading slump. The comics helped me stay out of it. I also read them on my way to BookCon in Chicago, which was handy because they didn’t take up much space in my luggage and were perfect for the short amount of time I had for reading that weekend.

Well then, here are three more comics I read so far this year.

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Two Classics: “Caligula” by Suetonius and “Murder on the Orient Express” by Agatha Christie

I hardly do mini reviews, but I find it fitting for these books since I don’t have much to say on either one. Both were quick reads. Caligula understandably so since it’s an excerpt of Robert Graves’s translation of Suetonius’s The Twelve Caesars and is only about 58 pages. Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express is longer at 265 pages, but is simply an entertaining read and I haven’t much to say on it.

Caligula

Caligula

…was a crazy-ass dude. Whenever I confess to certain people that I want to read The Twelve Caesars by Suetonius, they reply with a surprised Why?? Why would I want to read about such horrible things? One of my few reader friends often asks me this whenever I mention the book because she was unable to stomach the contents of the book when she first attempted to read it.

The Twelve Caesars is the biography of the first caesars of the Roman Empire. In that way, it details the beginning of the empire and its decline. I believe it was in Michael Dirda’s Classics for Pleasure that I first heard of this book and had my interest in it piqued. In that mention, I believe it was said that The Twelve Caesars was the first sensational publication, like a gossip column or People magazine series. Suetonius pokes into the rulers’ lives and lets loose all the dirty bits and that’s what my nosy butt is interested in.

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