Top Ten Tuesday #19: Spring 2016 TBR

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s topic:

Ten Books I Really Love But Feel Like I Haven’t Talked About Enough/In A While

It’s been a while since I’ve done one of these posts. I really wanted to do last week’s topic, which was about Spring TBRs, but I didn’t feel like doing it then. Plus, I forgot to do it. But, on a positive note, I’m much more in the mood to do a TBR this week and participate in this week’s topic. I usually stay away from TBRs because I hardly ever adhere to them, but I really want to do one now so here it is.

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“Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking” by Susan Cain

Available on Amazon and at your local bookstore.
Available on Amazon and at your local bookstore.

I am an introvert through and through. I like solitude. I enjoy sorting through my thoughts or dreaming up stories to entertain myself. I am shy at times and find it hard to operate in intimate sit-down-and-chat parties, where small talk is the mode for socializing. Last year, when I was hooked on TED Talks, I came across Susan Cain’s TED Talk. It intrigued me that someone who claims to be shy could do such a compelling, and at times funny, talk. Upon discovering that she had written a book about introverts, I became excited and immediately wanted to purchase it. But, being one of the many postgrads with a huge student loan, I was unable to quickly attain what I desired. A few months passed before I could purchase it.

Cain’s book is just as compelling as her TED Talk albeit longer. Like most nonfiction books these days, it is written for a mainstream audience and deftly mixes narrative with facts and data to engage the common reader and sustain his interest. Cain is a bit heavy with the narrative and sometimes the reader will tire of the stories but the reader will hardly want to skip them since they help to illustrate the facts Cain states. Basically, the stories are not unnecessary. Cain ensures that they all tie into the facts that she plans to expound on, or that they highlight those facts she has already stated. The narratives range from a peek at Rosa Parks’ personality at the beginning of the book to a profile on Asian students in California to stories on notable businessmen who benefit from being an introvert. These stories help to demystify some tales associated with being classified an introvert and highlight its benefits.

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