Book Tag Week: Bookish Scenarios Book Tag

Book Tag Week continues with the Bookish Scenarios Book Tag, which was created by booktuber LindsayHeartsBooks.

You have to get rid of all your books and you can only keep one from each of these genres —contemporary, fantasy, nonfiction, and one other genre of your choosing. What books do you keep?
Contemporary

The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants by Ann Brashares

The beginning of a YA fantasy series about four friends who share a pair of jeans one summer that magically fits them all. These books are so sweet and I love how strong the friendship is between the girls.

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Book Tag Week: Types of Memes Book Tag

Book Tag Week!! 😀

And now I present the Types of Memes Book Tag. It was created by Icebreaker694. I would have included pics of the memes, but that’s too much to do and I’m feeling lazy so just pretend I included them, yah!

Grumpy Cat
A book you have negative feelings about

Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

Celaena Sardothien sucks. She’s not a great assassin at all! I’ve only read the first 2 books of this series and they were both average. Because of what the story promised – the protagonist being a badass assassin, – I was disappointed by it. The protagonist doesn’t reach that level.

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Book Tag Week: Sailor Moon Book Tag

Book Tag Week continues with the Sailor Moon Book Tag, which was created by booktuber Alexa Loves Books.

Moon
A book that makes you hungry

Delicious! by Ruth Reichl

A contemporary novel about a young woman who moves to New York City to work at a food magazine. I read this one last year and though I liked it at first, I was annoyed by the time it ended. The only thing I consistently loved was the food mentioned. I still would like to try making the cake the protagonist is great at baking. A recipe for it is included in the book.

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Book Tag Week: Pro-Wrestling Book Tag

It’s BOOK TAG WEEK y’all!!! 😀 😀

What’s Book Tag Week, you may or may not ask? It’s exactly as it sounds. It’s a week of only book tag posts on Zezee with Books.

I often do book tags on here but sometimes, when I’m stressed or out of ideas or out of book reviews or in a blogging slump or just feel like posting a bunch of book tags, I declare a Book Tag Week. I’m starting to think of it as a fun blogging holiday. Hmm… 🙂

There are no set dates for Book Tag Week. It pops up whenever the fancy takes me and may even last for more than a week because I feel like it should.

So, if you’re stressed, in a slump, bored, or just wanna post some book tags all week, you’re more than welcome to join in BOOK TAG WEEK with me! 😀

Well, I’m gonna kick it off with a bang. Here’s the….

Pro-Wrestling Book Tag

The Pro-Wrestling Book Tag was created by Neko Neha of the blog, BiblioNyan. She also runs a booktube channel of the same name where she posted the original version of this tag.

Power Bomb
A book or book series that lifted you up only to slam you right back down hard at the end

Tawney Man trilogy by Robin Hobb

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“Born to Run” by Bruce Springsteen

It was morning. As always, I was rushing to catch my bus to work but stole some time to look up an audio book to listen to on my way there and while working. Work is boring. Traveling to work on public bus can be aggravating. I needed a distraction.

I pulled up my Overdrive app and scrolled through audio books. I couldn’t find any available for books I’ve already read, which is the best way for me to consume audio books because it’s hard for me to remember or focus on new-to-me reads on audio. Then I said fuck it. Let me just download a random one. I pulled up a list of popular audio books and downloaded the one that snagged my attention first — the black and white cover of Bruce Springsteen’s Born to Run. I didn’t even know who the dude is, but I knew that a lot of people raved over the book. It could be good, I thought as I popped in my headphones and hopped out the door.

Genre:

Nonfiction — autobiography, music

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“Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops” by Jen Campbell

I read Jen Campbell’s Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops a couple weeks ago because I’d completed Shaun Bythell’s The Diary of a Bookseller and wasn’t ready to stop reading about hilarious experiences in bookshops.

Genre:

Nonfiction, humor

Pubbed:

2012

Goodreads summary:

This Sunday Times bestseller is a miscellany of hilarious and peculiar bookshop moments: ‘Can books conduct electricity?’

‘My children are just climbing your bookshelves: that’s ok… isn’t it?’

A John Cleese Twitter question [‘What is your pet peeve?’], first sparked the ‘Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops’ blog, which grew over three years into one bookseller’s collection of ridiculous conversations on the shop floor.

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Comics Roundup #22: “Audubon: On the Wings of the World”

With this, I complete a second book published by Nobrow Press. I own a few books by this publisher on my bookshelves, but it’s my nature to pay more attention to books I don’t own. Hence the two book I’ve read by this publisher were both borrowed from the library. But I don’t mind that. I’m just happy that I’ve finally read books published by Nobrow Press to confirm that they are one of my favorite publishers. I’ve always admired the books they feature on their IG account and now it seems that I’ll probably always like their content. 😊


Audubon: On the Wings of the World by Fabien Grolleau, illus. by Jérémie Royer, trans. by Etienne Gilfillan

Genre:

Nonfiction: biography

Pubbed:

2016

Quick summary:

Audubon: On the Wings of the World is a biography of John James Audubon (born Jean-Jacques Audubon in Haiti in 1785), the noted artist, naturalist, and ornithologist most known for his book Birds of America, which contains 435 paintings of different species of birds in America observed in their natural habitat. Written and illustrated by Fabien Grolleau and Jeremie Royer, respectively, this graphic novel portrays Audubon as a passionate, determined man striving to paint and record all the birds of America in the 1800s.

Though Audubon’s persistence and efforts are admirable, the book does not shy away from showing less savory aspects of the man, such as his disdain for his mentor Alexander Wilson, the long lengths of time he spent away from his wife and children as he pursued his passion, the immense debt he gained from failed business ventures, and that he hunted and killed many birds in his pursuit to document and study them.

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