Weekend Reads #73: How I Organize My Blog

Weekend Reads is a weekly post in which I discuss a variety of topics and mention the books I plan to read on the weekend.

I’m behind on everything in life at the moment. My tag-filled week (last week) did not go as planned because I’m in the midst of changing jobs and for some reason, my crazy butt thinks I must catch up on everything at my old job before leaving for the new one. Smh. No one does that!

I’m trying to chill and take it easy, but I think I went overboard on that goal this weekend and did almost nothing. I was so chill that I almost forgot about Father’s Day. Btw, shout out to all the dads. I got my dad a pint of ice cream because I know that’s his weakness.

Anyway, I have a whole week off before starting the new gig so I’ll try to catch up on posts, beginning with this late Weekend Reads post.

For this weekend, I once again checked the Book Blogger Hop for a topic. The Book Blogger Hop is a weekly book discussion meme created by Jennifer at Crazy-For-Books in March 2010 and now managed by Billy at Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer.

This week’s question was submitted by Elizabeth at Silver’s Reviews:

How do you organize your blog in terms of what is in your side bar? Do you have categories and defined sections in your side bar?

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Weekend Reads #72: Busy and Tired

Weekend Reads is a weekly post in which I discuss a variety of topics and mention the books I plan to read on the weekend.

This post was inspired by Sara Letourneau’s recent Thursday Thoughtfulness post, which asked:

What are your favorite ways of “recharging your batteries”? Do you think that rest, relaxation, and other forms of mindfulness are important parts of everyday life? Why or why not?

Good timing, Sara. This was exactly what I intended to talk about.

My blogging — posting and interacting with other bloggers — have been spotty lately because I’ve been busy and by the time I sit down to write, I’m either tired or not in the mood. Often, this means that I need to recharge. It means that I’m overtaxed in some way, either working too much at my job or socializing too much in my life, which is fun but leaves me drained afterward.

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Weekend Reads #71: On Writing

Weekend Reads is a weekly post in which I discuss a variety of topics and mention the books I plan to read on the weekend.

Again, I hopped over to Sara Letourneau’s blog for inspiration because I couldn’t think of anything. In a recent Weekly Writer Wisdom post, she asked this question inspired by a William Gass quote (I focused on the questions rather than the quote in my response.):

How do you view the act of writing? If you could compare writing to other activities or process, what would you liken it to? Why? What other thoughts do you have when you read this quote?

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“Letters to a Young Writer: Some Practical and Philosophical Advice” by Colum McCann

I told myself I wouldn’t buy another book about writing until I actually started to write. I don’t know what it is, if it’s fear or laziness, but I keep preventing myself from writing what I want to write. I’ll sit down with the intention to jot down the story in my head, but I either run away from the empty page, or write a few pages worth of stuff, get anxious, and run away. I don’t know what my problem is.

When I saw McCann’s Letters to a Young Writer in the bookstore, I couldn’t walk away from it. I was pulled toward it. I picked it up. I skipped the intro and read the first essay, I held it away from myself wondering if I should buy it, I walked around the store with it in hand, I paid and left with it. The title harkens to Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet, which I read off and on one summer in New York, and that made McCann’s book seem promising. He will surely get me writing, I thought.

But McCann is frank about what he can’t do for us and what we can do for ourselves. He mentions in his introduction a statement he includes on his syllabus at Hunter College of the City University of New York, where he teaches in the MFA program — that he can’t teach his students anything. He can’t teach us how to write (or make us write), but he can guide us and allow us to do what we most want to do. And in this book, he is sincere, though frank, as he advises us on writing.

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Weekend Reads #69: Reading and my beliefs

Weekend Reads is a weekly post in which I discuss a variety of topics and mention the books I plan to read on the weekend.

I often run out of ideas for discussion posts so along with Sara Letourneau’s Thursday Thoughtfulness and Weekly Writer Wisdom posts, which inspired my last Weekend Reads post, I’ll also look to the Book Blogger Hop feature for ideas.

The Book Blogger Hop is a weekly book discussion meme that was created by Jennifer at Crazy-For-Books in March 2010 and is now continued by Billy at Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer. It offers bloggers the chance to find new blogs, gain followers, and discover new books. It also provides a long list of discussion topics that stretch well into 2018, so no need to cast around for topics if you can’t think of any.

This week’s question was submitted by Maria at A Night’s Dream of Books:

Would you stop reading a book if an element of the plot strongly clashed with your personal beliefs, or would you continue reading until you finished the book?

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Weekend Reads #68: Cinderella

Weekend Reads is a weekly post in which I discuss a variety of topics and mention the books I plan to read on the weekend.

This weekend’s post is inspired by a Weekly Writer Wisdom post I saw on Sara Letourneau’s blog that asks:

What stories (novels, myths, legends, etc.) have taken up residence in your soul? How or why do you think they moved you to this degree? Has a story ever inspired you to do something new or different, change your worldview, etc.? Is this something you hope to accomplish with your own work?

Instead of focusing on several books/stories that have resonated with me, I’ll instead discuss one that has stuck with me since the first time I read it as a child, Cinderella.

We’re all familiar with this fairy tale about a girl who’s abused by her evil step-mother, attends a ball with the help of her fairy god mother, and is later rescued from her horrible life by a charming prince. I can’t recall having the story read to me, but I do recall reading it over and over again as a kid.

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Guest Post: Miri Castor

With this post, I’m introducing a new feature: Guest Posts! I think this will be a great way to broaden the scope of my blog, introduce bloggers and authors, and discuss things I’m not well versed on or do not usually mention on here.

The first person to be featured is Miri Castor, author of the young-adult fantasy series Opal Charm, who will share what it took to write the first novel in the series, The Path to Dawn.

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